The Ood Cast S01E04 – The Waters of Mars

Tap tap tap tap.

Tap tap tap tap.

Do you remember the old days of “Classic Who”? You know, the days when budgets were the size of your mum’s weekly housekeeping allowance which meant that stories were claustrophobic and terrifying, even when the monsters occasionally seemed to be constructed from items you saw her making a cake with the week before?

No? Well, it doesn’t matter… Not all of us do either. But we’ve seen a lot of it on VHS…

But Who and isolated bases on the surface of a foreign planet is a marriage made in heaven, right?

Download the newest episood to find out what happened after we watched The Waters of Mars in a darkened room, complete with a few glasses of liquid handy, which members of our happy band then refused to touch for considerable time afterwards.

Oh, and to find out what exactly caused an argument that might yet cause the premature end of the podcast…

And the others probably talked about High Definition, and CGI “rendering”, resolution and other aspects of watching a lighty-up screen on the other side of the room that I don’t understand.

Save your tissues though, because we’ve almost got to the final of the 5 death rattles Mssrs Tennant and Davies served up for our viewing pleasure. And those were where the real tear-jerking moments were… (well, that’s what it said in the Radio Times…)

Comments 2

  1. I’ve just listened to The Argument and I don’t think you’re disagreeing as much as you think you are. Yes, it’s quite clear from the narrative that Adelaide commits suicide as an existential act to nip the Doctor’s megalomania in the bud. Having convinced her how fundamental her death is to History/the Universe in general, and her granddaughter in particular, the Doctor then saving her must have felt like a betrayal, but what tips it for Adelaide is seeing what a dangerous monster he has become. Whether suicide is a credible act for the character to perform is another matter, but it (dying to prove a point) happens enough in theatre to be plausible here. And in terms of slapping some sense into the Doctor, it clearly works, hurrah. But in terms of repairing the damage to History, it seems to me the only possible way this could have worked is (a) the other two explain what happened on the base and what a hero Adelaide was, (b) her suicide is explained as stemming from an inability to cope with the decision she had to make, (c) there is some stigma attached to her as a result of her suicide and the (apparent, not actual) risk she took by returning to Earth and possibly bringing the Flood contagion with her, and (d) her granddaughter becomes a space pioneer as a way of erasing this stigma and thereby honouring Adelaide’s memory. I started out with the opinion that this made no sense whatsoever, but thinking about it some more, it actually makes more sense to me than the pre-interference course of events as described.

    Having said that, I think this whole sorry mess could have been avoided if the Doctor had evacuated them to some point in the past or future, effectively faking their deaths and preserving the course of History. But that would have been too easy, wouldn’t it?

  2. FOUR YEARS LATER….

    “Having said that, I think this whole sorry mess could have been avoided if the Doctor had evacuated them to some point in the past or future, effectively faking their deaths and preserving the course of History.”

    Yeah, I thought the same thing at the end of this episode. But they needed a memorable way to send off David Tennant. So he needed to make a big mistake. If he had sent her into the future to meet her granddaughter at a point in time that was in flux, that wouldn’t really be a mistake and there would be no need to “punish” The Doctor, as it were, for it.

    Good stuff.

    -Arvis

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *